Monday, July 9, 2018

Dangerous Heat and Possible Thunderstorms Later this Week


Impacts

● Near record high temperatures Thursday through this weekend could cause heat illnesses if overexerting. Stay out of the sun,

especially in the afternoon, and stay hydrated.

● Be careful if recreating in the rivers due to cold water temperatures especially just downstream of dams.


Forecast Confidence

● High confidence for near-record heat.

● Low confidence for thunderstorm coverage and locations.


Timing and Strength

Heat





○ West of the Cascades, many of the inland valleys will see high temperatures between 101 and 106 degrees

Thursday through this weekend. Low temperatures may only fall into the middle to upper 60s Friday and Saturday

mornings. It will be a little cooler in the Umpqua Valley with highs peaking in the middle to upper 90s.

○ East of the Cascades, high temperatures in the valleys will be in the 90s.


Cold Water




○ The colder river temperatures are only in the 50s and lower 60s.


Thunderstorms




○ A slight chance of thunderstorms Friday through this weekend for mainly northern California and east of the

Cascades.


Weather Summary



High temperatures will range between 10 and 15 degrees above normal Thursday through this weekend. Excessive heat watches will

likely be issued followed by heat warnings and advisories. Record highs for Medford later this week are around 107 degrees, and for

Klamath Falls around 100 degrees. We do not expect these records to be reached but we could see temperatures peak to within a few

degrees of record highs across southern Oregon and northern California. Monsoonal moisture from the southwest U.S. may move toward

our region later in the week with thunderstorms possible beginning Friday afternoon.



Thursday, July 5, 2018


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 5, 2018
Contact: Courtney Vanbragt,
cvanbragt@klamathcounty.org, or Valeree Lane, vlane@klamathcounty.org, 541.882.8846

 

Smoke intrusion from California wildfire influences Klamath’s air quality

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. – Smoke intrusion from California’s County Fire, which is east of Lake Berryessa in Napa and Yolo counties, is expected to create air quality concerns in Klamath County. The air quality outlook for 2 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday July 6 is expected to be in the range of moderate to unhealthy for sensitive groups.  

The Weather Service is forecasting south to southeast winds during the day, which will facilitate the smoke reaching the Klamath Basin. Forecast models indicate that the smoke may remain in the area into midafternoon. Sensitive groups, such as people with asthma, should avoid prolonged or heavy exertion, and consider moving activities indoors or rescheduling.  Everyone should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion, and take more breaks during all outdoor activities.  

Weather conditions and smoke levels can vary dramatically during wildfires, not only from one day to the next but on an hourly basis. Smoke may also impact one portion of a community but not another.

To learn how to use visibility to measure risk of health effects, visit


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Friday, May 4, 2018


ALL WOODSTOVES, PELLET STOVES AND FIREPLACES MAY BE USED INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE AQ ZONE as per Klamath County Ordinance 406.100.

OUTDOOR BURNING IS NOT ALLOWED INSIDE THE AIR QUALITY ZONE as per Klamath County Ordinance 406.150 (2). Check with your local fire district for outdoor burning outside the air quality zone. Chiloquin fire district has closed all outdoor burning until october 2018.

 


 During a Wildfire


If advised to evacuate, do so immediately. Take your disaster supply kit, lock your home and choose a route away from the fire hazard. Watch for changes in the speed and direction of the fire and smoke. Tell someone when you left and where you are going.

If you see a wildfire and haven't received evacuation orders yet, call 9-1-1. Don't assume that someone else has already called. Describe the location of the fire, speak slowly and clearly, and answer any questions asked by the dispatcher.

If you are not ordered to evacuate, and have time to prepare your home, FEMA recommends you take the following actions:

·         Arrange temporary housing at a friend or relative’s home outside the threatened area in case you need to evacuate.

·         Wear protective clothing when outside – sturdy shoes, cotton or woolen clothes, long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, gloves and a handkerchief to protect your face.

·         Gather fire tools such as a rake, axe, handsaw or chainsaw, bucket and shovel.

·         Close outside attic, eaves and basement vents, windows, doors, pet doors, etc. Remove flammable drapes and curtains. Close all shutters, blinds or heavy non-combustible window coverings to reduce radiant heat.

·         Close all doors inside the house to prevent draft. Open the damper on your fireplace, but close the fireplace screen.

·         Shut off any natural gas, propane or fuel oil supplies at the source.

·         Connect garden hoses to outdoor water faucet and fill any pools, hot tubs, garbage cans, tubs or other large containers with water.

·         Place lawn sprinklers on the roof and near above-ground fuel tanks. Leave sprinklers on and dowsing these structures as long as possible. Be mindful of water use restrictions for areas affected by wildfires.

·         If you have gas-powered pumps for water, make sure they are fueled and ready.

·         Place a ladder against the house in clear view.

·         Disconnect any automatic garage door openers so that doors can still be opened by hand if the power goes out. Close all garage doors.

·         Place valuable papers, mementos and anything "you can't live without" inside the car in the garage, ready for quick departure. Any pets still with you should also be put in the car.

·         Place valuables that will not be damaged by water in a pool or pond.

·         Move flammable furniture into the center of the residence away from the windows and sliding-glass doors.

·         Turn on outside lights and leave a light on in every room to make the house more visible in heavy smoke.

 

Thursday, May 3, 2018


ALL WOODSTOVES, PELLET STOVES AND FIREPLACES MAY BE USED INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE AQ ZONE as per Klamath County Ordinance 406.100.

 

OUTDOOR BURNING IS NOT ALLOWED INSIDE THE AIR QUALITY ZONE as per Klamath County Ordinance 406.150 (2). Check with your local fire district for outdoor burning outside the air quality zone. Chiloquin fire district has closed all outdoor burning until october 2018.

                                                                        

 

2018 Air Quality Awareness Week (April 30, 2018 to May 4, 2018)

 

Before a Wildfire

The following are things you can do to protect yourself, your family and your property in the event of a fire.

·         To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.

·         Design and landscape your home with wildfire safety in mind. Select materials and plants that can help contain fire rather than fuel it.

·         Use fire-resistant or noncombustible materials on the roof and exterior structure of the dwelling, or treat wood or combustible material used in roofs, siding, decking or trim with fire-retardant chemicals evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

·         Plant fire-resistant shrubs and trees. For example, hardwood trees are less flammable than pine, evergreen, eucalyptus or fir trees.

·         Regularly clean roof and gutters.

·         Inspect chimneys at least twice a year. Clean them at least once a year. Keep the dampers in good working order. Equip chimneys and stovepipes with a spark arrester that meets the requirements of National Fire Protection Association Standard 211. (Contact your local fire department for exact specifications.)

·         Use 1/8-inch mesh screen beneath porches, decks, floor areas, and the home itself. Also, screen openings to floors, roof and attic.

·         Install a dual-sensor smoke alarm on each level of your home, especially near bedrooms; test monthly and change the batteries at least once each year.

·         Teach each family member how to use a fire extinguisher (ABC type) and show them where it's kept.

·         Keep handy household items that can be used as fire tools: a rake, axe, handsaw or chain saw, bucket and shovel.

·         Keep a ladder that will reach the roof.

·         Consider installing protective shutters or heavy fire-resistant drapes.

·         Clear items that will burn from around the house, including wood piles, lawn furniture, barbecue grills, tarp coverings, etc. Move them outside of your defensible space.

Plan Your Water Needs                                                                                                         

·         Identify and maintain an adequate outside water source such as a small pond, cistern, well, swimming pool, or hydrant.

·         Have a garden hose that is long enough to reach any area of the home and other structures on the property.

·         Install freeze-proof exterior water outlets on at least two sides of the home and near other structures on the property. Install additional outlets at least 50 feet from the home.

·         Consider obtaining a portable gasoline powered pump in case electrical power is cut off.

Your best resource for proper planning is www.firewise.org which has outstanding information used daily by residents, property owners, fire departments, community planners, builders, public policy officials, water authorities, architects and others to assure safety from fire - it really works. Firewise workshops are offered for free all across the nation in communities large and small and free Firewise materials can be obtained easily by anyone interested

 

 

Tuesday, May 1, 2018


GREEN” The Air Quality Advisory for today Tuesday May 1st, TO NOON, tomorrow Wednesday May 2nd IS GREEN. 

                                  

The Green Advisory Call means:  

 

1.    ALL WOODSTOVES, PELLET STOVES AND FIREPLACES MAY BE USED INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE AQ ZONE as per Klamath County Ordinance 406.100.

 

2.    OUTDOOR BURNING IS NOT ALLOWED INSIDE THE AIR QUALITY ZONE as per Klamath County Ordinance 406.150 (2). 

 

 

3.    OUTDOOR OR OPEN BURNING IS ALLOWED OUTSIDE THE AIR QUALITY ZONE as per oar# 340-264-0060 (3) and Klamath County Ordinance # 406.100 (4)(E), You must have a permit for outdoor burning in Chiloquin. Call Chiloquin’s Fire District office for a permit Do not burn trash.

 

 

 

 

2018 Air Quality Awareness Week (April 30, 2018 to May 4, 2018)

 

Talking Points on Asthma and Wildfires

 

Smoke from wildfires is a mixture of gases and fine particles from burning trees and other plant materials. Smoke can hurt your eyes, irritate your respiratory system, and worsen chronic lung diseases, including asthma, emphysema and bronchitis.

 

Groups at heightened risk for health problems from smoke exposure include children, older adults and anyone with lung diseases. Children are particularly susceptible to smoke because their respiratory systems are still developing and they breathe in more air—and consequently more pollution—per pound of body mass than adults.

 

The Oregon Public Health Division recommends individuals who are sensitive to smoke exposure take the following precautions:

 

  • Reduce the amount of time spent outdoors. This can usually provide some protection, especially in a tightly closed, air-conditioned house in which the air-conditioner can be set to re-circulate air instead of bringing in outdoor air. Staying inside with the doors and windows closed can usually reduce exposure.
          

  • Reduce the amount of time engaged in vigorous outdoor physical activity. This can be an important and effective strategy to lower the dose of inhaled air pollutants and minimize health risks during a smoke event.
     
  • Reduce other sources of indoor air pollution. Many indoor sources of air pollution can emit large amounts of the same pollutants present in wildfire smoke. Indoor sources such as burning cigarettes, gas, propane and wood-burning stoves and furnaces, and activities such as cooking, burning candles and incense, and vacuuming can greatly increase the particle levels in a home and should be avoided during high pollution or when wildfire smoke is present.

 

Individuals with lung diseases such as asthma should follow their health care providers' advice about prevention and treatment of symptoms, including using the full spectrum of medications their doctor has prescribed to control them. Those with an asthma action plan should follow it closely and monitor their breathing and exposure to airborne matter.

 

Anyone experiencing symptoms should contact a health care provider for further advice, or call 911 in an emergency.

 

Monday, April 30, 2018


GREEN” The Air Quality Advisory for today Monday April 30th, TO NOON, tomorrow Tuesday May 1st IS GREEN. 

                                  

The Green Advisory Call means:  

 

1.    ALL WOODSTOVES, PELLET STOVES AND FIREPLACES MAY BE USED INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE AQ ZONE as per Klamath County Ordinance 406.100.

 

2.    OUTDOOR BURNING IS NOT ALLOWED INSIDE THE AIR QUALITY ZONE as per Klamath County Ordinance 406.150 (2). 

 

 

3.    OUTDOOR OR OPEN BURNING IS ALLOWED OUTSIDE THE AIR QUALITY ZONE as per oar# 340-264-0060 (3) and Klamath County Ordinance # 406.100 (4)(E), You must have a permit for outdoor burning in Chiloquin. Call Chiloquin’s Fire District office for a permit Do not burn trash.

 

 

Air Quality Awareness 2018 week

 

Health effects of smoke

 

Wildfires expose populations to a number of environmental hazards, e.g., fire, smoke, and the byproducts of combustion of wood, as well as, plastics and other chemicals that can be released from burning structures and furnishings, and also hazards such as psychological stress. During the acute phase, the major hazards are from the wildfire itself and associated smoke exposure.

Particulate matter exposure is the principal public health threat from short-term exposures to wildfire smoke. The effects of smoke range from eye and respiratory tract irritation to more serious disorders, including reduced lung function, bronchitis, exacerbation of asthma and heart failure, and premature death. Most of our understanding on the health effects of wildfire smoke are derived from studies of urban particulate matter, specifically fine particulate matter. These studies have found that short-term exposures (i.e., days to weeks) to fine particles, a major component of smoke, are linked with increased premature mortality and aggravation of pre-existing respiratory and cardiovascular disease. Children, pregnant women, and elderly are also especially vulnerable to smoke exposure. In addition, fine particles are respiratory irritants, and exposures to high concentrations can cause persistent cough, phlegm, wheezing, and difficulty breathing. Exposures to fine particles can also affect healthy people, causing respiratory symptoms, transient reductions in lung function, and pulmonary inflammation. Particulate matter may also affect the body’s physiological mechanisms that remove inhaled foreign materials from the lungs, such as pollen and bacteria.

 

Carbon monoxide (CO) enters the bloodstream through the lungs and reduces oxygen delivery to the body’s organs and tissues. CO concentrations typical of population exposures related to wildfire smoke do not pose a significant hazard, except to some sensitive individuals and to firefighters very close to the fire line. Individuals who may experience health effects from lower levels of CO are those who have cardiovascular disease: they may experience chest pain or cardiac arrhythmias. At higher levels (such as those that occur in major structural fires), CO exposure can cause headache, weakness, dizziness, confusion, nausea, disorientation, visual impairment, coma, and death, even in otherwise healthy individuals.

 

Wildfire smoke also contains significant quantities of respiratory irritants, which can act in concert to produce eye and respiratory irritation and potentially exacerbate asthma. Formaldehyde and acrolein are two of the principal contributors to the cumulative irritant properties of smoke.

 

One concern that may be raised by members of the general public is whether they run an increased risk of cancer or of other chronic health conditions (e.g. heart disease) from short-term exposure to wildfire smoke. It is well characterized that smoke contains carcinogenic components with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) comprising the largest percent, and to a lesser extent benzene and formaldehyde. People exposed to toxic air pollutants, such as the ones mentioned above, at sufficient concentrations and durations may have slightly increased risks of cancer or of experiencing other chronic health problems. However, in general, the long-term risks from short-term smoke exposures are quite low. Short-term elevated exposures (i.e., 14 over days to weeks) to carcinogens found in wildfire smoke are also small relative to total lifetime exposures to carcinogens in other, more common combustion sources. For example, epidemiological studies have shown that urban firefighters who are occupationally exposed to smoke over an entire working lifetime are at increased risk of developing lung cancer (Hansen 1990) and other cancers (Daniels et al. 2014).

 

It is important to recognize that not everyone who is exposed to thick smoke from wildfires will have health problems. The level and duration of exposure, age, individual susceptibility, including the presence or absence of pre-existing lung (e.g., asthma, COPD) or heart disease, and other factors play significant roles in determining whether someone will experience smoke-related health problems. The types of potential individual responses should be discussed in public warnings about risks and the need to avoid exposure to smoke.

 

 

Monday, April 23, 2018


“GREEN” The Air Quality Advisory for Monday April 23rd, until Tuesday April 24th, is GREEN. 

 

The 2018 Spring Open Burning Window within the Klamath County Air Quality Zone is in effect beginning at 8 am, Saturday April 14th, and will end at 5 p.m. Sunday, April 29, 2018.

 

The conditions of the Spring 2018 Open Burning Window are:

·       Only residential yard waste, such as tree limbs, brush, and leaves may be burned.

·       No plastic, rubber, tar, petroleum products, treated wood or waste may be burned.

·        Burning of commercial, construction, demolition or industrial waste for these purposes requires a special permit from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality.  Contact DEQ in Bend at (541) 388-6146.

·       All burning must occur between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. and be fully extinguished by 5 p.m.

·       Burning of commercial, construction, demolition, or industrial materials is prohibited.

·       The Air Quality Advisory must be “GREEN”.  The advisory is available by calling 541-882-BURN (2876).

·       Fire District requirements for public safety are winds between 4-10 mph for outdoor burning. Please monitor your burn area closely.