Thursday, September 22, 2016


KLAMATH COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION WILDFIRE SEASON DAILY UPDATE/FORECAST FOR AIR QUALITY

 

The air quality outlook for today Thursday, September 22, 2016, from 8 a.m. today until 8 a.m. Friday September 23, 2016, is “good”.  The forecasted mixing heights for Klamath County are good all day and on into tomorrow morning.

Always be prepared, because weather conditions and smoke levels can vary dramatically during wildfires, not only from one day to the next, but on an hourly basis. Smoke may also impact one portion of a community but not another.

Friday, September 16, 2016


                                        KLAMATH COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION WILDFIRE SEASON DAILY UPDATE/FORECAST FOR AIR QUALITY

 

The air quality outlook for today Friday, September 16, 2016, from 8 a.m. today until 8 a.m. Monday September 19, 2016, is “good”.  The forecasted mixing heights for Klamath County are good all day and on into tomorrow morning.

Always be prepared, because weather conditions and smoke levels can vary dramatically during wildfires, not only from one day to the next, but on an hourly basis. Smoke may also impact one portion of a community but not another.

 

Thursday, September 15, 2016


KLAMATH COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION WILDFIRE SEASON DAILY UPDATE/FORECAST FOR AIR QUALITY

 

The air quality outlook for today Thursday, September 15, 2016, from 8 a.m. today until 8 a.m. Friday September 16, 2016, is “good”.  The forecasted mixing heights for Klamath County are good all day and on into tomorrow morning.

Always be prepared, because weather conditions and smoke levels can vary dramatically during wildfires, not only from one day to the next, but on an hourly basis. Smoke may also impact one portion of a community but not another.

 

 

Wednesday, September 14, 2016


KLAMATH COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION WILDFIRE SEASON DAILY UPDATE/FORECAST FOR AIR QUALITY

 

The air quality outlook for today Wednesday, September 14, 2016, from 8 a.m. today until 8 a.m. Thursday September 15, 2016, is “good”.  The forecasted mixing heights for Klamath County are good all day and on into tomorrow morning.

Always be prepared, because weather conditions and smoke levels can vary dramatically during wildfires, not only from one day to the next, but on an hourly basis. Smoke may also impact one portion of a community but not another.

Monday, September 12, 2016


Volunteer September 11th to September 17th

People wearing green hard-hats and green-vest saying "CERT", volunteers for a CERT Team, working to clean up

Hurricane Katrina and the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001 caused many Americans to wonder how they can help prepare their communities.

Through Citizen Corps, individuals can learn about opportunities to get involved and help build capacity for first responders. With proper training and education, civilian volunteers expand the resources available to states and local communities. Many partner organizations offer public education, outreach and training for free.

 

Neighborhood Watch

USA On WatchUSAonWatch is the face of the National Neighborhood Watch Program. The program is managed nationally by the National Sheriffs' Association in partnership with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, and US Department of Justice.

Time-tested practices such as "eyes-and-ears" training and target-hardening techniques continue to be at the core of the program. As groups continue to grow, the roles of citizens have become more multifaceted and tailored to local needs. USAonWatch empowers citizens to become active in homeland security efforts through community participation. USAonWatch provides information, training, technical support and resources to local law enforcement agencies and citizens.

Learn more by visiting the USAonWatch homepage.

 

Volunteers In Police Service

VIPS - Volunteers in Police ServiceThe Volunteers In Police Service (VIPS) Program provides support and resources for agencies interested in developing or enhancing a volunteer program and for citizens who wish to volunteer their time and skills with a law enforcement agency. The program's ultimate goal is to enhance the capacity of state and local law enforcement to utilize volunteers. The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) manages the VIPS Program in partnership with the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), Office of Justice Programs, and US Department of Justice.

Learn more by visiting the Volunteers in Police Service homepage.

 

American Red Cross

American Red CrossFor more than 122 years, the mission of the American Red Cross (ARC) has been to help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies. A humanitarian organization led by volunteers, guided by its Congressional charter and the fundamental principles of the International Red Cross Movement, the ARC is woven into the fabric of our communities with 940 chapters nationwide.

In fulfilling its mission, ARC is empowering Americans to take practical steps to make families, neighborhoods, schools and workplaces safer, healthier and more resilient in the face of adversity. Through the Together We Prepare program, the ARC provides training for the public in community disaster preparedness and response; and lifesaving skills training (First Aid and CPR). The program also encourages people to donate blood and volunteer to help build community preparedness.

Learn more by visiting www.redcross.org.

KLAMATH COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION WILDFIRE SEASON DAILY UPDATE/FORECAST FOR AIR QUALITY

 

The air quality outlook for today Monday, September 12, 2016, from 8 a.m. today until 8 a.m. Tuesday September 13, 2016, is “good”.  The forecasted mixing heights for Klamath County are good all day and on into tomorrow morning.

Always be prepared, because weather conditions and smoke levels can vary dramatically during wildfires, not only from one day to the next, but on an hourly basis. Smoke may also impact one portion of a community but not another.

Wednesday, September 7, 2016


Make A Plan September 4th to September 10th

A family makes an emergency plan together

Emergency Communication Plan

This page explains what an emergency communication plan is and why you should make one. It also provides tips and templates on how to make a plan.


Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to think about the following situations and plan just in case. Consider the following questions when making a plan:

·         How will my family/household get emergency alerts and warnings?

·         How will my family/household get to safe locations for relevant emergencies?

·         How will my family/household get in touch if cell phone, internet, or landline doesn’t work?

·         How will I let loved ones know I am safe?

·         How will family/household get to a meeting place after the emergency?


Here is a template that you can download, print, and fill out:

·         For parents (PDF)

·         For kids (PDF)

·         For transit commuters (PDF)

·         For your wallet (PDF)

·         Steps to make a plan (PDF)


Here are a few easy steps to start your emergency communication plan:

1.    Understand how to receive emergency alerts and warnings.  Make sure all household members are able to get alerts about an emergency from local officials. Check with your local emergency management agency to see what is available in your area, and learn more about alerts by visiting: www.ready.gov/alerts.

2.    Discuss family/household plans for disasters that may affect your area and plan where to go. Plan together in advance so that everyone in the household understands where to go during a different type of disaster like a hurricane, tornado, or wildfire.  

3.    Collect information. Create a paper copy of the contact information for your family that includes:

·         phone (work, cell, office)

·         email

·         social media

·         medical facilities, doctors, service providers

·         school

4.    Identify information and pick an emergency meeting place. Things to consider:

·         Decide on safe, familiar places where your family can go for protection or to reunite.

·         Make sure these locations are accessible for household members with disabilities or access and functional needs.

·         If you have pets or service animals, think about animal-friendly locations.

Examples of meeting places:

·         In your neighborhood: A mailbox at the end of the driveway, or a neighbor’s house.

·         Outside of your neighborhood: library, community center, place of worship, or family friend’s home.

·         Outside of your town or city: home of a relative or family friend. Make sure everyone knows the address of the meeting place and discuss ways you would get there.

5.    Share information. Make sure everyone carries a copy in his or her backpack, purse, or wallet. You should also post a copy in a central location in your home, such as your refrigerator or family bulletin board.

6.    Practice your plan. Have regular household meetings to review your emergency plans, communication plans and meeting place after a disaster, and then practice, just like you would a fire drill.